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is the right candidate at in the state of florida we have 820,000 people out of work. people have given up looking for work. we need somebody in the white house who understands how jobs are created. it is not government that creates jobs. this individual to create jobs. when mitt romney is president he is going to need another united states senator, republican senator from florida. [applause] how many here have already voted? [applause] and for those of you who wake up tomorrow morning and go vote. after you vote for mitt romney go down the ballot a little more and vote for connie mack. can you do that? there are dig differences between senator nelson and myself. he was the deciding vote for obamacare. i voted against obamacare. [applause] senator nelson has voted for higher taxes 272 times. i voted to cut taxes. [applause] senator nelson voted to gut our military. i voted to strengthen our 34il8 tear. military [applause] a couple of things happen when i beat senator nelson. the second thing that happens is harry reid will no longer control the agenda. [applause] so florida, we're counting
. they were friends. they made a wide theory they had the good sense to lead in florida in june instead of massachusetts. then there were wiped out by the spanish. we left the story out of the textbooks. the most famous woman in america was taking captive by indians in 1695. in the middle of the night, she killed her captors. realizing she could get a bounty for indian scalps, she went back and made her way to boston where she was a heroine. she directed -- is that she was elected to her. -- erected to her. >> kenneth davis is our guest sunday, taking your calls and e- mails on and death. he is the best-selling author of the "don't know much" series. watch live at noon eastern on c- span2. >> mitt romney campaign in jacksonville, florida tonight with jeb bush and connie mack. they held two other rallies early in the day. one in tampa and another in coral gables. this is 40 minutes. >> good evening, jacksonville. how are you? ready to take back the white house? i thought you might be. how did you enjoy five for fighting? he's a really good guy. did you enjoy his song "freedom never cries
we think we will be officially the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we planned for, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same percent of the electorate as in 2008. we got 65% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, voting rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battleground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino vote since 1996. in florida increase from 14% in 2008 to 17% in 2012. we increased our vote share in florida
'll look at virge. >> now we'll go to jacksonville florida where mitt romney is to speak shortly. he is with jeb bush. >> you ready to take back the white house? i thought you might be. how did you enjoy five for fighting? he's a really good guy. did you enjoy his song "freedom never cries"? this is an important election. this an election about what the future of america is going to be. is our future going to be more debt and more regulation and more taxes? sor our future going to be in less taxes, less regulations and. nibble mitt romney. he's the right candidate at the right time to be the president of the united states. [applause] you know in the state of florida we have 820,000 people out of work, people who will looking for work, people who have given up looking for work. we need someone who understands how jobs are created. that individuals create jobs not government that creates jobs. [applause] . when mitt romney is president he is going to need another united states senator republican nites senator from florida. [applause] how many here have already voted? [applause] and for
was the first or second thing you saw or heard that told you this might not be such a good night? >> florida. how it has not been called yet. it was so tight and obama was a little bit ahead and he continued to be a half. >> there was no route to his 70 without florida. but florida was not a good sign. >> when we look at how swing voters and how good faith, when you look at the exit poll data, independents voted for romney. usually independents tipped the scale, but that did not happen. >> one of the things that was one on in the blogosphere was the role of independents. can either one of you address what made one pulled different from another in terms of how they ask the question and that sort of thing? >> certainly. here it is a self-described. when we do the polling, we are asking people how you identify. partisan identification does jump around. independents, as you get closer to the election, there are few people are truly independent. they are leaning one way or the other. six daystar profiling leaning democrat or leaning republican. -- they start profiling leading democrats or leaning
reelection with 303 electoral votes with florida's 29 still undetermined and over 50% of the popular vote. the national journal hosted several panel discussions breaking down the road to results and looking at the implications for national politics and the congressional agenda. >> it turned out not to be as long night as people expected and we're going to talk about that today and why and look forward to how the president to make go forward from this victory which think is safe to say it was quicker and bigger than many people expected. would you like to tell us how this happened and -- why this happened and how? >> it was bigger than we expected. he really swept the battleground states. the only states that he lost that he had won in 2008, was north carolina which he had won by 14,000 votes in 2008. it was considered a fluke. what that tells us is that the set of assumptions that the obama campaign was operating on was correct. and a set of assumptions that the romney campaign was operating on was not. it's sort of make sense in a way sense obama's theory about the campaign turned out to
that is a good thing. the people in ohio, virginia, florida, nevada -- they took this election enormously seriously, understood the unique role they had to play. voters in battleground states understand they have a unique role a lot of us the citizens united to enjoy because they are not and state that will determine the president. >> the super pac's dynamic this time was obviously new and unprecedented. you had senate candidates -- sherrod brown in ohio had $40 million spent against him by super pac's. we had in the last week of our campaign $100 million spent against the president. that is more than the mccain campaign spent in its entirety. remarkable thing. a lot of senate candidates still one. but in house races it had an impact. barack obama, sherrod brown, governors -- they have definition. the spending is a little less nefarious. it's still tough to deal with, but you are not somebody who is now and then somebody drops $4 million on your head will have an impact. we have never seen spending like this. there is a term in politics called gross rating points, the amount of television
vote in florida within 0.2%. >> you are confident in your data because of the redundancy you had. tell us about the date you got every night. >> i hope we get into my feelings on american polling, especially the public wants, we decided to go deep. we had an hour and alex team and do several thousand calls -- >> describe that. >> it was a department they used to data across the campaign to make everyone's job better. we had over 60 full-time analytics people. every night they would do thousands of random sample calls. every night i had to look in all of the battleground states and every night they would run, a 66,000 bottles of the campaign. >> that has been said before. what does that mean? >> we built a model similar to run the campaign over and over and over. it gives us a likelihood of caring that state. that allows our media team to spend money wiser in the battleground state. it means you run that many simulations to get a statistically relevant sample to make sure the data was right. every night they did that. then we had our talented pollster. then we had state posters. each ha
a republican who workedke bobby, with democrats to put together a state wide scholarship bill. in florida, they had the scholarship program, for kids to get scholarships to go to private schools, when that was passed 10 years ago, we had one member of the black caucus vote for it. when it came up for renewal, we have the majority of black and hispanic caucus vote for it. each of them said we are doing this because it is helping our children. as we move forward, that has got to beat the order of the day for our country. thank you all very much. i appreciate your generosity. i want to take some questions before we have to wrap up. thank you. [applause] k you very much,. . i appreciate what you are doing. in california, we have not adopted as much, doctors and twice as you have seen in washington d.c. when we introduce choice, the public schools, the bar will rise because they have to keep up with the charter schools. is that a belief you experienced in washington d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% to place? >> it makes a difference. i do not think
turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the first time infer florida. you saw young voters actually exceeding in most states their turnout from four years ago to the surprise of most analyst. you saw african turn out even though the excitement was four years ago, you saw a real determination there to support the president and you saw african-american rise in a lot of places. that is getting a lot of attention as it should. you have to understand electorate to understand presidential politics. but the president carried most of the key swush suburban counties t. states that are the four heaviest in white population the president won all four of them. so it may be convenient to say we drove good turnout in the latino and african-american community but it's more complex because the president won swing suburban voters and women voters all over the country. presidential campaigns are complicated t. pursuit of 270 electoral votes is complicated. how we won 332 is complicated. it's not just one thing and we'll talk a lot about what that means for politics going forward. one thing i've learn
jobs. she is a great congresswoman from florida. she is a mother, never an easy job, and she has decided yes when asked to be the share of -- the chair of our party at the national democratic committee, and never an easy job. she has done an incredible job, and i just want you to think about what she has done at the helm of our great party. not only does she ensure the reelection of barack obama, but she did it by making sure there was a constant conversation about what women were facing in which their health care and their lives every day, making sure everyone in this country knew what was at stake. i think she will deliver florida, which is pretty impressive. she has been an incredible leader, and someone to look at, and we really do see her as a role model, so we hope even though i knew she has three major jobs, and i know they are very much hoping she keeps all three jobs, because we cannot imagine seeing the next two years where we still have to fight to get a house back. we have one more thing we need to do. having debby wasserman schulz will help us get there. thank you so
florida, bill posey. mr. posey: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the opportunity to join with me colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged bipartisan coalitions to support important legislation and no program, in my view, has benefited more if his bipartisan commitment than the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralp
, they made wind. they had the good sense to land in florida in june instead of in massachusetts. they were completely wiped out by the spanish. a woman was taken captive in 1695 and marched into new hampshire. in the middle of the night she kills her captors, realized that she can get a bounty for indian scalps. she stopped them and made her way to boston. this is the first at 22 in american women. it showed her with a hatchet in one hand and scallops in the other. >> he is the best selling author of the "don't know much" series. >> with just five days to go until election day, and romney called on ohioans to vote early for her husband. during a rally, she said he will not fail women and the american people. this is a half hour. >> thank you. i am so pleased to be here today. what a warm welcome. what a lovely group of people. we are into the final days. isn't this exciting? we are going in the right direction. we are so pleased to be here. i have had a love the opportunity to travel with and through the months now and i see and her summit things that will be is so lovely in a first lady.
or larger, by the way. you have these guys coming in in places like florida. and cliff stearns was leading the solyndra investigation. but he could not make it happen. it was not enough for his district. and i have a large animal that wants to see term limits and so on and so forth coming in. on the other side, you have a longtime democratic members retiring and been replaced. >> and then you have the fiscal votes. john boehner manage to round up republicans on the oversight of the caucus and joined with nancy pelosi and the government kept running. they put together the budget control act. they put together this bipartisan coalition. nobody wanted to take credit for it because it was embarrassing to the republicans to go back home and say, in the end, we are running the government in a bipartisan way. yes, there will be ideological hotheads. but even among those freshmen, when they start feeling the pressure about the fiscal cliff approaching from the big factories, is that what they really want? i think it will get it done. >> it seems to me, there are two factions of the republican part
now ask unanimous consent, mr. posey of florida, mr. burrows of georgia and mr. matheson of utah to be allowed to sit in and ask questions at the conclusion of the other seeded members. without objection, so ordered. it is now my pleasure to recognize the distinguished gentleman mr. davis. >> i thank you for calling this hearing. as one who has spent much of my adult life working as a professional in the areas of health planning, health research and delivery, i firmly believe that the federal government has an important role to help understand what is in spectrum disorders and -- understand autism spectrum disorders and to help those with its inner life span. i also want to commend the former chairman of this committee, my good friend dan burton, for using his position as chairman and beyond to focus on this particular issue and calls the committee and others to continuously take a hard look at it. i commend you for your efforts and certainly wish you well as you revert back to private life. i am very proud to represent a premier institution involved in the research and service p
chu. democratic caller from florida, you are up first. caller: in my opinion, wall street is the problem. they treated this deficit because of all of the underhanded things that went on with the mortgages. now they do not want to pass the extension of unemployment. they are putting as back so many years by doing this. everyone is going to end up in the hole, living on the streets, and no one will be able to do anything. host: dominic chu. guest: there is a case to be made that wall street excesses' contributed to the financial crisis. a lot of that some of these lawmakers and policy makers, regulators, investors, they have been trying to right the situation. a lot of the big banks in this country took a lot of taxpayer assistance that brought them through the depths of the financial crisis and they have emerged, as the ceos claim, as more well-capitalized institutions. they may be able to sustain a crisis or in the future without having to take more taxpayer raid. that's not to say there's no one at fault. if you looked at the overall picture of the stock market right now,
with us. thank you for your support. my name is patrick murphy from florida district 18. the youngest member of congress. i did defeatists someone you may know -- a guy named alan west. with the help of a lot of people behind me. thank you for your support. throughout this campaign the one message i heard was the need for bipartisanship to reach across the aisle. that is what we need to do. we have to put our country first. what i talked about with my colleagues is problem solvers, doing what is best for americans. to what is best for all americans. that is what we will do. that is what our country needs. that is what i plan on doing. thank you all very much. i appreciate it. >> without further ado, still working in to whatever comes next, the great chairman of the democratic congressional trepang committee. a leader in the congress while he was going to the work he was doing. he had to meet the needs. he did faithfully in first of his constituents who were under siege from hurricane sandy. he has his priorities in order. he knows his policy. he loves his american people. he is very p
of florida and perhaps virginia. it was a close election but the reality as the party that gets less than 8% of the african- american vote in less than 40% of the vote of those coming up to the system is a party that needs to adjust. i talked about that today, some of its policy and tone is a more inclusive message tigran out how to take our positions on economy, growth, and opportunity. and translating that into a way young people understand and appreciate. you get out of school and look at a 50% unemployment rate. you would think that would be big issue in the deficit to read is now $55,000 for every young person getting out of college. those issues are ones you are not able to communicate in a way that was effective clearly to the majority vote and some of these social issues are also very important. they look at these issues differently than our generation. >> it is a different attitude now reacted laws that and deal with it. >> does the president have a mandate to raise taxes? your minority leader in the senate will my colleague last week that he does not believe that is his mandate. >
democratic challenger. let us look at florida, the 18th district. representative allen west is getting a fierce challenge from a democrat, tied with 99% of precincts reporting. moving to minnesota, a republican is tied with the democratic challenger. in minnesota, let us look at representative michele bachman's race, the former presidential candidate. the republican is tied up with jim graves. north carolina's seventh district is also tied up. moving on to another seat, utah, the republican has 48% of the vote. she is not quite caught up yet to be a democrat. that is a closely watched race, because mia love is an african american republican woman. at the moment, she is slightly trailing the incumbent. you can follow all the races on c-span.org. >> em haqqani mac losing in florida -- and connie mack losing in florida. dustin is on the phone from idaho, republican line. we continue to look at the scene inside chicago's mccormick place. your reaction to the results? >> how are you? >> fine, thank you. >> i was a little surprised with the results. i think, from the's concession speech and
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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